Aug 26
Cacophanus

By Cacophanus from Mecha Damashii

DX Chogokin YF-30 Chronos by Bandai (Available From HobbyLink Japan – HLJ.com)

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Following the unboxing, here is our review of Bandai’s DX Chogokin YF-30 Chronos as seen in the PS3 game Macross 30. As this is a Macross variable fighter, expect a lot of fun transformation and this toy handles the various modes really well too.

The name Chronos comes from the Greek god of time, which is likely to do with Macross 30’s timeline spanning narrative and setting. It’s also an apt name for pretty much any Macross variable fighter toy, as to transform them properly you want to take your time. Whilst this is currently the most advanced Macross toy from Bandai in terms of engineering to date, it is still something that has to be handled with care.

This is not to say it is fragile, far from it, but the detailing and sculpt are of a very high standard. This means taking care to transform the YF-30 will pay dividends in keeping the toy in pristine condition. Thankfully, Bandai has thought the same and released two very helpful videos on how to transform the toy.


As this is a chogokin, you can expect a good amount of sturdy diecast throughout the toy. This is especially true for the crucial inner joints used in transformation. Considering the amount of effort that has clearly gone into getting the transformation right, we hope Shoji Kawamori would be proud. In any case, on with the review!

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Each of the modes are handled as per the game model, which is no real surprise as it’s very likely that the game assets were used in the creation of this toy. The sculpt is pretty much flawless, too. The detailing across the toy is also very good and the pilot figure is a nice, though somewhat basic, touch. The gunpod attaches to the missile pod at the rear and as such locks the missile pod down, as in game you can flip the missile pod up in fighter mode.

The interesting change in this design though is how the arms are handled. Normally on most variable fighters the arms fit between the legs. As the missile pod takes up that space, the arms now slide along the outside legs. To hide the hands, a compartment in the legs opens and the lower arms also clip into the wing. Hard points are present across both wings but currently there aren’t any missiles available to attach (though these will be likely released in a later webshop exclusive).

In addition to various hands, some partially articulated, there is also a spare pair of antenna for the head. The gunpod also opens up into sniper mode, as per the game. The real party piece is the missile pod though. Both sides have individually opening hatches and the whole pod can be easily detached, too. The arm connector for the missile pod is almost entirely made of diecast, too, which is a good piece of design in regards to durability.

The new torso joint is also a nice touch and allows both GERWALK and battroid modes to strike some pretty novel poses. This is made even more awesome by the addition of a very capable stand, also included with the toy.

Overall this is a very well-made toy and despite its size and weight is still quite a sleek- looking figure once transformed. Even if you haven’t played the game the YF-30 Chronos has come from, this is probably the finest variable fighter toy Bandai has produced. It comes thoroughly recommended to any and all fans of Macross as well as toy collectors who appreciate quality engineering and sleek transformation sequences.

Comments

  1. this would be a nice kit to build, really a challenge

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